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There are approximately 1,250 golf courses in America. Golf carts are being used off the course as well. They are used on college campuses, in sports stadiums and even on private properties. Over a 16-year span, from 1990 to 2006, the American Journal of Preventative Medicine says that there were close to 150,000 people injured in accidents involving golf carts. Most of these accidents were attributed to someone’s negligence.

We understand that you may have some questions after you have been involved in a golf cart accident. We are here to help answer some of those questions.

1. Is there a statute of limitations?

Yes. Depending on when and where the accident happened, there is most likely a limited amount of time for you to file a lawsuit. If you do not file your claim within a certain time frame, it may be barred from court. In North Carolina, that limit is generally three years. There are many different rules and exceptions that govern the time allowed for the filing of a lawsuit.  Please speak with a lawyer to determine the statute of limitations that governs your claim.

2. Who should I name in my lawsuit?

A golf cart is considered a vehicle. The person driving the cart at the time of your accident may be named in the lawsuit if they were negligent. The owner of the cart, if different than the driver, may also be named in certain circumstances. The owner and managers of the facility in which your accident occurred may be named in the lawsuit if the accident can be attributed to improper grounds maintenance or another issue.

3. How do I establish liability?

You will need to show the court that the person you are claiming was negligent had a reasonable duty for care. You must show that they breached that duty, that you were injured, and that your injuries were a direct result of that negligence.

4. What damages are available?

If you can prove your claim, you may be entitled to a range of damages. These include medical bills, property damage, lost wages and more. Your attorney can help you determine exactly what damages you may be entitled to based upon the unique circumstances of your accident.

5. What are my first steps?

The first step in any personal injury proceeding is to find a reputable and experienced attorney. While you can certainly file a lawsuit on your own, an attorney will have the knowledge necessary to prove your case and secure the compensation you are entitled to.

If you have been injured in a golf cart accident in Charlotte, you have legal rights you may not be aware of. Whether you have sustained property damage or injury, you may be entitled to compensation for your financial loss. Call our team of experienced attorneys today to speak us about your potential claims. Time is of the essence; schedule your free consultation now.

Anyone over the age of 50 has been alive as long as golf carts have been around. Seeing a golf cart on the green or even motoring on the boardwalk is nothing new. But where did these motorized vehicles come from? The golf cart has a rich history that few know.

The first motorized cart was available for public use in the 1950’s, but was invented in 1935. The man credited with putting the first cart together is Lyman Beecher of Clearwater, Florida. Beecher, an electrical engineer, put together a non-motorized cart that required two men to pull it. People say that it looked like a sort of rickshaw with a seat and two wheels.

Beecher is said to have used his golf cart while at his North Carolina summer home. The inventor played golf on hilly terrain and was afraid that he would not be able to walk the course on his own. Hence his need for a pulled cart.

Five short years after its conception, the golf cart was modified. Beecher invented a golf cart run with car batteries. The only problem? It took the juice of six batteries to give the cart enough life to last 18 holes. Beecher’s invention was the cart of choice until after World War II.

R.J. Jackson, a Texas oilman, received the first patent in the United States for a gas-powered cart. The cart, dubbed the “Arthritis Special,” was created and built so older golfers or those who were seriously ill could enjoy the game. Interestingly, the cart was banned from many courses because of its habit of belching black smoke.

Banned or not, these carts were not immediately available to the public. Anyone wishing to rent a cart needed a note from their doctor. Once course owners realized that motorized golf carts could be money makers, they opened rentals to the public.

In 1955, only 40 percent of courses in the country had carts available to their players. Just 12 years later in 1967, 92 percent of courses made carts available for rent. Today, there are more than 2 million carts in the country. They can be found on golf courses, resort towns, and even on the streets of major cities. Quite impressive for a machine that started with three wheels and manpower.

If you have been injured in a golf cart accident, our attorneys are here to help you. We have experienced lawyers that can help you get the compensation you may be entitled to by law. Call today for your free initial consultation.

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