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Top Ten Myths and Misconceptions Surrounding Motorcycles

Do you think you know everything there is to know about riding motorcycles? Even if you are a seasoned rider, there may still be things you are not aware of regarding motorcycle safety. There is no shortage of myth and misconception surrounding bikes, their riders and their safe operation.

Here are 10 of those myths and misconceptions, many of which you may have believed in at one point or another.

  1. Loud Pipes Make You Safe

Many people believe that a louder exhaust pipe on a bike leads to more safety for the rider. When you think about it, it makes sense. If you can make your motorcycle as loud as possible, other drivers on the road are more likely to notice you.

Research has shown that this actually isn’t the case. In fact, bikes with modified exhaust systems are involved in more crashes. If you want to be noticed, wear a bright helmet and light-colored clothing.

  1. Helmets Do More Harm Than Good

Some people don’t wear a helmet because they believe head protection does more harm than good. People believe that the added weight on their head makes it more likely for them to break their neck in an accident.

This isn’t true. People who wear helmets sustain fewer head and neck injuries than those who don’t. This is because a helmet is made to absorb the force of an accident.

  1. Helmets Hinder Vision

This one may have some basis in truth. A helmet that doesn’t fit properly could potentially make it more difficult for you to see, if it slips and slides. On the other hand, a properly-fitting helmet will not hinder your vision or your hearing.

  1. Helmets Fail at High Speeds

The simple fact is that a rider is more likely to survive a crash if they are wearing a helmet, no matter the speed.

  1. Skill Makes You Safer

Some riders believe that if they have enough skill, they can handle anything. Of course, the more experienced you are, the safer you are, but it doesn’t mean you are invincible.

Do not believe the lie your experience will keep you out of harm’s way. An enhanced sense of skill may have you operating your bike more recklessly than you would otherwise.

  1. Younger Riders are Reckless

Out of all motorcycle deaths, nearly half occur in the over-40 age bracket. In the last decade, fatalities among riders over 50 years old have risen by 400 percent. Researchers attribute this fact to inexperience and more powerful motorcycles on the market.

Just because someone is young doesn’t mean they are more dangerous. Someone’s age doesn’t relate to their probability of getting into an accident.

  1. Side Streets are Safer

Some riders stick to side streets, believing that they are safer than highways. In some instances, this could be true, but in most, it isn’t.

Think about your nearest highway. All drivers are traveling in the same direction and there are no added dangers of cyclists, pedestrians, stop signs and other objects on the side of the road. If you look at the statistics, motorcyclists are much safer on the highway than they are on a neighborhood street.

  1. One Drink Is Okay

You may not feel intoxicated after one drink and think you are okay to hop on your bike and ride wherever you like. This isn’t the case. Even one drink can slow down your reaction time.

The faster you react to a situation, the better off you are — perhaps even more so on a motorcycle than in a car or truck. If you are out on your motorcycle, you should not consume any alcohol under any circumstances.

  1. Other Drivers Don’t Care

This is simply untrue. If you ride your motorcycle, try not to get a chip on your shoulder about drivers in cars and trucks. They do care about you; it’s just that many may not understand how to treat a motorcycle rider safely.

It’s often easy to tell the drivers who are riders themselves or who have riders in their family. They will stop further behind you, give you wider berth and look over both shoulders before turning lanes. Be sure to give a wave of thanks to these people. They may be the ones to educate others.

  1. Non-Motorcycle Drivers Don’t Want to Share the Road

Yes, there are some bad and selfish drivers out there that act like they own the road.  However, no one wants to be in an accident. As more and more people use motorcycles for transportation, the general driving public is becoming more accustomed to driving with more and more bikes on the road.  Just continue to be a safe driver that is focused on the road!

Speak with a North Carolina Motorcycle Accident Attorney Today

The aftermath of a motorcycle collision can be very serious. You may suffer head trauma, broken bones or even spinal injuries. If you are one of the lucky ones, you’ll walk away with a bit of road rash and live to tell the tale. If you are involved in a catastrophic accident, you could lose your life. Knowing the facts about motorcycles, their riders and how to safely use them can help you avoid some of the most common collisions.

If you are involved in a motorcycle accident in Charlotte, you have legal rights. Call our office today to schedule a free case evaluation. If another driver is responsible for causing your accident, we will help you hold them accountable. You may be entitled to compensation for medical bills, lost wages and more. Reach out to our team today to schedule your consultation and get the help you need.

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